apache status, Steps to View Apache Status in WHM/Cpanel, Hostripples Web Hosting

Steps to View Apache Status in WHM/Cpanel

Hello Friends! The topic of our today’s blog is the “Apache Status” interface in WHM. Let’s discuss important options present in this interface but before that, let’s first discuss “Apache Status”.

Apache Status:

Apache: –

It is the most popular and cross-platform Apache web server which is mostly used in Linux and Unix platforms for deploying and running Web Applications or websites. It can be easily installed and it also requires a simple configuration.  It is also called a web server daemon i.e. httpd. Apache serves the web pages by responding to the HTTP requests.

For example: – If any visitor wants to visit your domain, www . testexample . com, from a web browser, at that time Apache is the one who serves the index page of your domain.

Status: –

There is a subcommand to view the status of a service which is: systemctl status.

Thus if you want to check the status of the Apache then this command is used. You can check the Apache status using systemctl.

Let’s see how to access the “Apache Status” interface in WHM:

Follow the below steps:

Log in to the WHM >> you will see the home page of WHM >> Navigate to the “Server Status” category >> Then click “Apache Status” option.

apache status, Steps to View Apache Status in WHM/Cpanel, Hostripples Web Hosting

Now let’s discuss the Heading information:

As the name specifies, this interface displays the heading information about Server Version, Server Built, Current Time, Restart Time, Parent Server Generation, Server Uptime, Total accesses, Total Traffic, CPU Usage. Let’s describe each of these Headings.

Server Version: It displays the version of Apache which runs on the server.

Server Built: It displays the time and date on which you installed Apache.

Current time: It displays the current time and date.

Restart Time: It displays the last time and date at which you restarted the server.

Parent Server Generation: It displays the information about the number of times that you have restarted the Apache which caused it to re-read the configuration file for example: -This occurs mostly when you add domains to your server.

Server Uptime: It displays the information about the amount of time for which the server was running.

Total Accesses: It displays the information about the total number of requests for your server.

Total Traffic: It displays the information about the total amount of traffic for your server which is displayed in MB i.e. Megabytes.

CPU Usage: It displays the information about the total CPU usage as well as the current load percentage of the server’s currently used processing power. It also displays the following additional information:

It also displays the number of requests per second, bytes per second and also the kilobytes per request which the server transfers.

It displays the information about the number of Apache sub-servers which are workers or children that server requests and also the number of idle workers.

There is one more option in this interface which is: “Scoreboard”.

Scoreboard:

This option displays the information about each worker on your server. Let’s see:

Srv: – It displays the information about the child server number generation.

PID: –It displays the information about the process ID number of the operating system.

Acc: – It displays the information about how many numbers of requests that this particular worker has served for this connection, this child, and this slot is separated by forwarding slashes (/). For example: – 0/2550/7671 indicates the following request data:

0 total how many requests served for this connection.

2550 total how many requests served for this child.

7671 total how many requests served for this slot.

M: – It displays the mode of operation, there are the following modes in this column:

  • It means that the server is waiting for the connection.

S    It means that the server is starting.

R    It means that the server is reading the request.

W   It means that the server is sending a reply.

K    It means that the server is in keep read mode.

D    It means that the server received a DNS request.

C    It means that the Server is closing.

L     It means that the server is logging.

G    It means that the server is gracefully finishing.

    It means that the Idle cleanup of worker.

.      It means that there is open slot with no current process.

apache status, Steps to View Apache Status in WHM/Cpanel, Hostripples Web Hosting

 CPU: – It displays the information about the worker’s CPU usage.

SS: – It displays the information about the number of seconds since the start of the most recent request.

Req: – It displays the information about the amount of time that the worker required to process the most recent request which is represented in milliseconds.

Conn: –It displays the information about the amount of information that the worker has transferred to the visitor represented in Kilobytes (KB).

Child: –It displays the information about the total amount of the information that the worker transferred in Kilobytes (KB).

Slot: – It displays the information about the total amount of information that the slot transferred which is expressed in Megabytes (MB).

Clients: – It displays the information about the IP address of the user who requested the data.

VHost: –It displays the information about the domain name of the server that requested the data.

Request: – It displays the information about the type of information that the server has received.

  • GET It indicates that Apache has downloaded the data.
  • POST It indicates that Apache has sent information to the server.
apache status, Steps to View Apache Status in WHM/Cpanel, Hostripples Web Hosting

Let’s see what SSL/TLS Session Cache Status is:

SSL Specification: –

It supports the caching and the reuse of an SSL session key in between subsequent requests from a client. It helps in improving the performance from the perspective of the client because it eliminates the need for a new SSL handshake to be conducted each time when a request is made.

Without this cached SSL session key which is a symmetric key and used for encrypting and decrypting communications made over the secure channel, a new key must be generated for each request.

TLS Session: –

For allowing the reuse of a recently valid TLS session ticket a TLS Session resumption is used which improves the performance for clients who are making multiple requests in the same way as SSL Session caching does.

It also helps in improving the performance from the clients’ perspective, because it removes the need for a new TLS handshake to be conducted each time a request is made.

A most important difference between TLS stateless resumption and SSL session caching is that the server does not require to cache SSL session keys which also reduce the memory burden on the server for supporting a number of clients.

A new session must be established for each request if the client or server does not support TLS session tickets. This feature is supported by most clients and servers so it is important to enabling it on your secure web server.

It displays the following information:

apache status, Steps to View Apache Status in WHM/Cpanel, Hostripples Web Hosting

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Steps to View Apache Status in WHM/Cpanel, Hostripples Web Hosting
Amit Jadhav
Amit Jadhav is working in Hostripples since years he is a passionate engineer... He is working as a senior technical support engineer, as it's a responsible position because it's a lifeline to our customers... Moreover he is dealing in troubleshooting server problems and is always ready to assist our customers in technical issues... Hostripples is glad to have Amit Jadhav on the board...
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